News

Biocomputing: Imitating the Real Thing to Improve Life

Author: Nina Welding

Pinar Zorlutuna and a team of University researchers have created a new type of diode, one that is made entirely of cardiac muscle cells and fibroblasts. Their recently published paper titled “Muscle-Cell-Based ‘Living Diodes’” discusses how using muscle cells as the diode components is ideal for cell-based information processing.

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Prof. Brian Baker’s lab receives $4 million NIH grant for precision immunotherapy research

Author: Tammi Freehling

Immunologists are changing how we look at cancer by studying how our immune system plays a role in treating cancer. Brian Baker, Ph.D. and his lab in the Harper Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry were recently awarded a $4 million, 5-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how they can best engineer a patient’s own T cells in their immune system to target the patient’s specific cancer.

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Datta Named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

Author: Nina Welding

On Tuesday (Dec. 13) the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) announced its 2016 NAI Fellows, including Suman Datta, Chang Family Professor of Engineering Innovation at the University of Notre Dame. Datta focuses on the physics and applications of novel nanoelectronic devices for energy efficient computing and storage systems. He also pursues demonstration of computing substrates that mimic Nature’s “natural” ways of computing.

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Reuters names Timothy Beers and Prashant Kamat 2016 highly cited researchers

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Thomson Reuters has named Timothy Beers, the University of Notre Dame Chair of Astrophysics, and Prashant Kamat, the Rev. John A. Zahm, C.S.C., Professor of Science, to its 2016 Highly Cited Researchers list. After Reuters analyzed Essential Science Indicators that included 128,887 highly cited papers ranked in the top 1 percent by total citations, the work of Beers and Kamat stood out as being among the most valuable and significant in their fields.

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Eli Lilly Faculty Fellowship Provides Drug Discovery Experience

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Diabetes is a metabolic disease in which the body has an inability to produce enough insulin. In the United States alone, it is estimated that the illness affects nearly 30 million diagnosed and undiagnosed people, and treatment often includes patients using an intravenous or IV method to get insulin into their system. This uncomfortable and inconvenient form of treatment can require anywhere from two to four injections a day, but a Notre Dame researcher is working to combat this problem with a less frequent, oral delivery system.

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Of Synergy and Science

Author: Andy Fuller

Change sometimes happens slowly, then all at once. On the northeast side of Notre Dame’s campus, a new quadrangle has emerged on space that seemingly just days ago was occupied by a parking lot and sidewalks. Anchoring this new quad on its east side is the state-of-the-art, 220,000 square foot McCourtney Hall of Molecular Science and Engineering. Its opening comes as shifts in the broader research community are hastening a change in how scientific discoveries are taking place.

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Applications Now Open for the Naughton Fellowships

Author: Joanne Fahey

The University of Notre Dame has opened its annual competition for the Naughton Fellowships. The prestigious international fellowships provide funding for exceptional Ph.D., masters, or undergraduate students with an aptitude for the STEM disciplines to complete research or study in Ireland or at Notre Dame.

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Fighting for Better Cancer Detection

Author: Brandi Klingerman

In the United States alone, there are nearly 240,000 breast cancer diagnoses each year, and one in eight women will develop breast cancer at some point in her lifetime. To date, mammograms are the best diagnostic technology for breast cancer. A mammogram’s ability to detect tumors at early stages has made breast cancer one of the most treatable forms of cancer, but there are still almost 50,000 missed diagnoses every year.

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Notre Dame-Purdue symposium encourages networking, collaboration opportunities in soft materials and polymer research

Author: Heidi Deethardt

Notre Dame’s third annual symposium on soft materials research was expanded this year to a two-university event.  On October 8, nearly 70 faculty, postdoc and student researchers attended the first Notre Dame-Purdue Symposium on Soft Matter & Polymers at Notre Dame’s Eck Visitors Center.

“The symposium functions as a platform to share research between schools in Indiana, to network between research groups, and to seek opportunities for collaboration,” said event co-organizer Haifeng Gao, Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at Notre Dame.  “We plan to include other nearby research universities in future events, such as the next one at Purdue University,” said event co-organizer Jianguo Mei, Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Purdue University.…

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Collaboration yields new understanding of nano properties needed to build new materials

Author: Gene Stowe

A collaboration between Jon Camden, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, David Masiello of the University of Washington, and Philip Rack of the University of Tennessee has directly observed hybridized magnetic resonances in plasmonic nanostructures for the first time. The achievement is a critical step toward developing materials that interact with light in unexpected ways and that may someday cloak military equipment throughout the visible spectrum or underlie future PV technology optimized to capture energy from the sun’s infrared rays. 

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Thirteen finalists selected for Notre Dame's 2016 undergraduate nanotech research competition

Author: Heidi Deethardt

The Center for Nano Science and Technology at the University of Notre Dame (NDnano) will host the following finalists who have been selected for the sixth annual NDConnect undergraduate nanotechnology research competition:

  • Joseph Burkhart, a senior studying chemistry at St. Olaf College. His research, conducted at Indiana University under the direction of Prof. Sara Skrabalak, is "Calculated packing-dependent optical behavior of Au octopods."  

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