News » Archives » 2017

Engineering Faculty Awarded DURIP Grants for Tunable Laser System and Transonic Wind Tunnel Research

Author: Nina Welding

Highly competitive, the annual DURIP awards process is a merit competition conducted jointly by the Army Research Office (ARO), Office of Naval Research (ONR), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). This year the DoD received more than 685 proposals. Approximately 160 of the proposals have been or will be funded. To date Notre Dame faculty — David Bartels, David Go, and Scott Morris — have received two Department of Defense (DoD) Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) grants for 2017, totaling more than $773,000.

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Notre Dame Researchers Open Path to New Generation of Optical Devices

Author: Nina Welding

Cameras, telescopes and microscopes are optical devices that measure and manipulate electromagnetic radiation [light]. Being able to control the light in these devices provides more information through a better “picture” of what is occurring. Specifically, controlling light on small scales could lead to improved optical sources for applications that span health,

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2017 Naughton Fellowship Awardees Announced

Author: Joanne Fahey

The research fellowships were awarded to undergraduate, Masters, and Ph.D. students from the University of Notre Dame and from five universities in Ireland. Three of the undergraduate fellows will work with NDnano faculty.

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Paul Bohn Receives 2017 ACS Award in Electrochemistry

Author: Rebecca Hicks

Paul Bohn, Arthur J. Schmitt Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, has been selected as the winner of the 2017 ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Electrochemistry. This prestigious award recognizes a scientist who advances the field of electrochemical analysis through conceptualization or development of unique instrumentation, elucidation of fundamental electrochemical events or processes, and/or authorship of important research papers that impact the field.

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Notre Dame Researchers Study Potential Cause of Common Birth Defect

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins are small peptides that get added on to other proteins to regulate their activity. While SUMO has many regulatory roles in cells, it is especially important for controlling gene expression during early development. Just a few years ago this connection between SUMO and gene regulation was relatively unknown, but now, Notre Dame researchers are exploring how a disruption to the SUMO protein’s ability to regulate embryo development may be linked to congenital heart defects. 

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NDnano Symposium: Nanotechnology in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders

Author: Heidi Deethardt

NDnano is hosting a one-day symposium on Thursday, ​March 30 entitled "Nanotechnology in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders." The keynote will be given by Kevin Tracey, M.D., President & CEO of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. Students are welcome and encouraged to attend the technical session and/or present their own related research in the afternoon poster session.

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Biocomputing: Imitating the Real Thing to Improve Life

Author: Nina Welding

Pinar Zorlutuna and a team of University researchers have created a new type of diode, one that is made entirely of cardiac muscle cells and fibroblasts. Their recently published paper titled “Muscle-Cell-Based ‘Living Diodes’” discusses how using muscle cells as the diode components is ideal for cell-based information processing.

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Prof. Brian Baker’s lab receives $4 million NIH grant for precision immunotherapy research

Author: Tammi Freehling

Immunologists are changing how we look at cancer by studying how our immune system plays a role in treating cancer. Brian Baker, Ph.D. and his lab in the Harper Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry were recently awarded a $4 million, 5-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how they can best engineer a patient’s own T cells in their immune system to target the patient’s specific cancer.

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Datta Named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

Author: Nina Welding

On Tuesday (Dec. 13) the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) announced its 2016 NAI Fellows, including Suman Datta, Chang Family Professor of Engineering Innovation at the University of Notre Dame. Datta focuses on the physics and applications of novel nanoelectronic devices for energy efficient computing and storage systems. He also pursues demonstration of computing substrates that mimic Nature’s “natural” ways of computing.

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