News

Paul Bohn Receives 2017 ACS Award in Electrochemistry

Author: Rebecca Hicks

Paul Bohn, Arthur J. Schmitt Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, has been selected as the winner of the 2017 ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry Award in Electrochemistry. This prestigious award recognizes a scientist who advances the field of electrochemical analysis through conceptualization or development of unique instrumentation, elucidation of fundamental electrochemical events or processes, and/or authorship of important research papers that impact the field.

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Notre Dame Researchers Study Potential Cause of Common Birth Defect

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins are small peptides that get added on to other proteins to regulate their activity. While SUMO has many regulatory roles in cells, it is especially important for controlling gene expression during early development. Just a few years ago this connection between SUMO and gene regulation was relatively unknown, but now, Notre Dame researchers are exploring how a disruption to the SUMO protein’s ability to regulate embryo development may be linked to congenital heart defects. 

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NDnano Symposium: Nanotechnology in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders

Author: Heidi Deethardt

NDnano is hosting a one-day symposium on Thursday, ​March 30 entitled "Nanotechnology in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders." The keynote will be given by Kevin Tracey, M.D., President & CEO of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. Students are welcome and encouraged to attend the technical session and/or present their own related research in the afternoon poster session.

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Biocomputing: Imitating the Real Thing to Improve Life

Author: Nina Welding

Pinar Zorlutuna and a team of University researchers have created a new type of diode, one that is made entirely of cardiac muscle cells and fibroblasts. Their recently published paper titled “Muscle-Cell-Based ‘Living Diodes’” discusses how using muscle cells as the diode components is ideal for cell-based information processing.

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Prof. Brian Baker’s lab receives $4 million NIH grant for precision immunotherapy research

Author: Tammi Freehling

Immunologists are changing how we look at cancer by studying how our immune system plays a role in treating cancer. Brian Baker, Ph.D. and his lab in the Harper Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry were recently awarded a $4 million, 5-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how they can best engineer a patient’s own T cells in their immune system to target the patient’s specific cancer.

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Datta Named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

Author: Nina Welding

On Tuesday (Dec. 13) the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) announced its 2016 NAI Fellows, including Suman Datta, Chang Family Professor of Engineering Innovation at the University of Notre Dame. Datta focuses on the physics and applications of novel nanoelectronic devices for energy efficient computing and storage systems. He also pursues demonstration of computing substrates that mimic Nature’s “natural” ways of computing.

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Reuters names Timothy Beers and Prashant Kamat 2016 highly cited researchers

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Thomson Reuters has named Timothy Beers, the University of Notre Dame Chair of Astrophysics, and Prashant Kamat, the Rev. John A. Zahm, C.S.C., Professor of Science, to its 2016 Highly Cited Researchers list. After Reuters analyzed Essential Science Indicators that included 128,887 highly cited papers ranked in the top 1 percent by total citations, the work of Beers and Kamat stood out as being among the most valuable and significant in their fields.

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Eli Lilly Faculty Fellowship Provides Drug Discovery Experience

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Diabetes is a metabolic disease in which the body has an inability to produce enough insulin. In the United States alone, it is estimated that the illness affects nearly 30 million diagnosed and undiagnosed people, and treatment often includes patients using an intravenous or IV method to get insulin into their system. This uncomfortable and inconvenient form of treatment can require anywhere from two to four injections a day, but a Notre Dame researcher is working to combat this problem with a less frequent, oral delivery system.

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Of Synergy and Science

Author: Andy Fuller

Change sometimes happens slowly, then all at once. On the northeast side of Notre Dame’s campus, a new quadrangle has emerged on space that seemingly just days ago was occupied by a parking lot and sidewalks. Anchoring this new quad on its east side is the state-of-the-art, 220,000 square foot McCourtney Hall of Molecular Science and Engineering. Its opening comes as shifts in the broader research community are hastening a change in how scientific discoveries are taking place.

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Applications Now Open for the Naughton Fellowships

Author: Joanne Fahey

The University of Notre Dame has opened its annual competition for the Naughton Fellowships. The prestigious international fellowships provide funding for exceptional Ph.D., masters, or undergraduate students with an aptitude for the STEM disciplines to complete research or study in Ireland or at Notre Dame.

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Fighting for Better Cancer Detection

Author: Brandi Klingerman

In the United States alone, there are nearly 240,000 breast cancer diagnoses each year, and one in eight women will develop breast cancer at some point in her lifetime. To date, mammograms are the best diagnostic technology for breast cancer. A mammogram’s ability to detect tumors at early stages has made breast cancer one of the most treatable forms of cancer, but there are still almost 50,000 missed diagnoses every year.

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